The Mystery Spot

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I got accepted to the University of Copenhagen!

I will now spend the next approximately three years getting my bachelor degree in history :D

  • WiFi: connected
  • Me: then fucking act like it

nephlium:

Have you ever been so delirious after reading for a while that you find yourself accidentally narrating all of the things you do inside your head?

(Source: mattbors.com)

avoxia:

the worst thing about tumblr is that you read all those pro feminist/anti rape/anti misogyny posts all the time everyday and then you actually go outside and talk to a random guy and it feels like being punched in the face with a chair

You’re so pretty.
You’re adorable.
You’re beautiful.
You’re my beautiful little girl.
Sweet little lady.
Careful! Don’t get hurt!
Play nicely.
Don’t get dirty.
Stop that.
Be more ladylike.
Don’t eat too much.
Shhhh.
Quiet.
Girls are duuumb!
Girls have cooties.
No girls allowed.
Hahahahaha! You have boobs!
Look at her boobs!
Boobs!
Boobs!
Boobs!
Boobs!
Ewwwww. Periods are disgusting.
You’re disgusting.
That’s gross.
Hahahahaha! You’ve got your period.
Boobs!
Let me touch them!
I want to touch them!
Disgusting.
Slut.
You’re gross.
Whore.
Let me touch it.
Bitch.
I only want to touch it.
She’s a slut.
Virgin.
Slut.
Virgin.
Slut.
You slut.
Show me your tits.
Get ‘em out!
Slag.
You want it.
Take it.
Have it.
Swallow it.
Slut.
Whore.
Stupid bitch.
Fat bitch.
You’re not quite right for this.
I’m not sure you can do it.
Tits.
Cunt.
I just want to fuck you.
Come on, you want it.
You’re not confident enough.
You need more experience.
No one will take you seriously.
Slut.
You’re too emotional.
It’s just a joke.
Lighten up.
Smile.
I don’t care what you think.
I just want to fuck you.
Tits.
Don’t wear that.
Slut.
You’re getting fat.
You’re too messy.
Come on, it was a joke.
Don’t be such an idiot.
Why are you so tired?
If I’m honest, I’m not really interested.
You do it.
I’m busy.
I can’t I’m working.
You wake up with it.
You take care of it.
You’re messy.
I’m too busy, you do it.
You need to lose weight.
You don’t spend enough time with me.
You aren’t interesting.
You’re boring.
Really, I’m not interested in that.
You’re looking a bit tired.
You should take care of yourself more.
You should take care of me.
You’re looking a bit old.
You’re old.
Wrinkles.
Flabby.
Dull.
Grey.
Ugly.
Haggard.
Hag.
*invisible*

- Female Socialisation by Gia Milinovich (via plansfornigel)

omg if baby oil dissolves condoms what the fuck does it do to babies???

Anonymous

the-kellin-under-the-vic:

This may be shocking, but babies and condoms are made of different material

morphia-writes:

littlemoongoddess:

onemuseleft:

ittlebitz:

starrysleeper:

Wait a minute…

I have been laughing at this for hours now…

So, true story. The woman in this photo is Kendra Kaplan. Her husband was in Iraq for twelve months but the military has this thing called leave. Some of us may recognize the concept from old episodes of Star Trek. In this photo she is five months pregnant after conceiving her second child during her husband’s leave. That envelope in her hand is the ultrasound results. She waited for him to come home to find out if it was a girl or a boy.
There’s been several articles about it.The photo resulted in this woman receiving so much hate mail, from both internet cut-ups and the actual media, that she even took a paternity test and provided proof of her husband’s leave schedule. Her real life friends have stopped talking to her over these rumors.  
Oh, and by the way, that baby bump is a two year old by now. People are still shitting on this woman over a nasty internet meme two years later.
So in short, you’re mocking a faithful wife for something that isn’t any of our damn business anyway and has long since been disproven. 
Good job Internet.

Thank you for this!

Finally a rebloggable version of this idiotic post. 

morphia-writes:

littlemoongoddess:

onemuseleft:

ittlebitz:

starrysleeper:

Wait a minute…

I have been laughing at this for hours now…

So, true story. The woman in this photo is Kendra Kaplan. Her husband was in Iraq for twelve months but the military has this thing called leave. Some of us may recognize the concept from old episodes of Star Trek. In this photo she is five months pregnant after conceiving her second child during her husband’s leave. That envelope in her hand is the ultrasound results. She waited for him to come home to find out if it was a girl or a boy.

There’s been several articles about it.The photo resulted in this woman receiving so much hate mail, from both internet cut-ups and the actual media, that she even took a paternity test and provided proof of her husband’s leave schedule. Her real life friends have stopped talking to her over these rumors.  

Oh, and by the way, that baby bump is a two year old by now. People are still shitting on this woman over a nasty internet meme two years later.

So in short, you’re mocking a faithful wife for something that isn’t any of our damn business anyway and has long since been disproven. 

Good job Internet.

Thank you for this!

Finally a rebloggable version of this idiotic post. 

(Source: itscalledfashionlookitup)

amurrrka:

While most statistics that are thrown around in regards to the gender wage gap don’t consider occupation, industry, and education, there is still a large percentage of the wage gap that goes unexplained once this is considered. By and large, women are paid less on the sole fact that they are women.And for the men who complain, “BUT TEH MENZ HAEV TO PAY FOR DINNERZ” (no, actually, you don’t), let’s pretend that it was law that all men had to pay for their dates.The unexplained wage gap that has a disparity of 10 cents per dollar is equal to $4,465 per year, or $156,275 over the course of a 35-year career.Let me put that in other terms for you. With that extra money from the wage gap you can do the following:-Pay for 700 steak dinners ($35/each)-Pay for 1,000 IMAX theatre ticket ($16/each)-Pay for 85 tickets to a broadway show ($85/each)-Fly 3 times from NYC to Paris and spend a week each time at a 4-star hotel ($6,000/trip)-Buy a 14K White gold diamond ring ($7,500)And still have $48,000 to spend on whatever else you want.So next time you complain about having to pay for a woman’s dinner (that you’re not obligated to pay) when the Wage Gap is discussed, sit yo ass down.

amurrrka:

While most statistics that are thrown around in regards to the gender wage gap don’t consider occupation, industry, and education, there is still a large percentage of the wage gap that goes unexplained once this is considered. By and large, women are paid less on the sole fact that they are women.

And for the men who complain, “BUT TEH MENZ HAEV TO PAY FOR DINNERZ” (no, actually, you don’t), let’s pretend that it was law that all men had to pay for their dates.

The unexplained wage gap that has a disparity of 10 cents per dollar is equal to $4,465 per year, or $156,275 over the course of a 35-year career.

Let me put that in other terms for you. With that extra money from the wage gap you can do the following:

-Pay for 700 steak dinners ($35/each)
-Pay for 1,000 IMAX theatre ticket ($16/each)
-Pay for 85 tickets to a broadway show ($85/each)
-Fly 3 times from NYC to Paris and spend a week each time at a 4-star hotel ($6,000/trip)
-Buy a 14K White gold diamond ring ($7,500)

And still have $48,000 to spend on whatever else you want.

So next time you complain about having to pay for a woman’s dinner (that you’re not obligated to pay) when the Wage Gap is discussed, sit yo ass down.

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.
The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”
The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.


Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.

The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”

The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.

Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.